Census: Early analysis shows falsifying data was rare

Census: Early Analysis Shows Falsifying Data Was Rare
Paul Sancya

FILE - This Sunday, April 5, 2020, file photo shows an envelope containing a 2020 census letter mailed to a U.S. resident in Detroit. On Tuesday, Oct. 13, 2020, the U.S. Supreme Court stopped the once-a-decade head count of every U.S. resident from continuing through the end of October.

The U.S. Census Bureau says less than a half percent of census takers interviewing households for the 2020 head count may have falsified their work, suggesting it was few and far between. The bureau released the figure Thursday in response to criticism that a shortened schedule was jeopardizing the data used for divvying up congressional seats among the states. The Census Bureau issued its statement after a report from their watchdog agency Wednesday that expressed concerns over lapses in quality control checks on the data collected from U.S. households. The Office of Inspector General says the Census Bureau failed to complete 355,000 re-interviews of households.