Pit bulls no longer listed as ‘dangerous’ in Pasco

Breed specific legislation removed from city code
Pit Bull Mixes

PASCO, Wash. — On Monday, the Pasco City Council unanimously decided to remove any dog ‘breed specific legislation’ from the Pasco Municipal Code.

This ruling means that pit bulls will no longer be automatically labeled as dangerous animals.

“All dogs are going to be treated as individuals and only dogs that actually exhibit dangerous behavior will be classified as potentially dangerous,” said local pit bull advocate Ashley Schoenwald.

The move, as Pasco police said Tuesday on social media, means “Pasco City Hall and Animal Control will now judge your dog based on his actions, not his looks,” and will not automatically consider a dog to be potentially dangerous just because the animal might be or is at least part pit bull.

Animals that attack people or other animals unprovoked can still be defined as a “dangerous animal,” according to a staff report. Police say your dog will still qualify as a dangerous dog or potentially dangerous dog if the animal bites people, injures or kills animals, or meets other criteria outlined by the city.

“Nothing about this change makes a bad owner less responsible for a bad dog,” police added. “If a dog bites or acts aggressively, those penalties are still the same.”

The changes should take effect next week, with no special requirements needed in order to license a pit bull as a pet, police said.

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Over the past year, a couple of dogs have made a big impact in Pasco and on the community at large. First there was the story of Chancie, the boxer-pit bull mix found injured along I-82 and rescued by an officer.

 

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