archaeology

Norway to return Easter Island artifacts

A Norwegian museum has agreed to return thousands of artifacts and human remains to Easter Island, after they were taken by explorer Thor Heyerdahl during two expeditions in the 20th century.

Unknown species found in new treasure trove of fossils found in China

A newly discovered fossil site in China that dates back 518 million years contains more than 50% previously unknown species, according to a new study. The well-preserved Qingjiang site is helping scientists to fill gaps in the fossil record and provide a clearer picture of some of the earliest animal ecosystems.

27,000-year-old giant ground sloth tooth found

Fossil discoveries are exciting on their own, but sometimes, they carry even more information about the past. Newly uncovered fossils from an extinct giant ground sloth that lived in Belize 27,000 years ago provide a portrait of what the climate was like for the last year that the sloth was alive, according to a new study.

Explicit Roman graffiti to be captured for posterity

While repairing Hadrian's Wall in the third century, some Roman soldiers amused themselves with a secondary activity: carving explicit graffiti. Now, archaeologists are creating a 3D record of the ancient markings, before they're lost to erosion.

Early humans hunted monkeys and squirrels in the rainforest

New evidence from Sri Lanka's oldest archaeological site suggests that early humans used sophisticated techniques to hunt monkeys and squirrels, according to a study published Tuesday in the journal Nature Communications.

New theory paints sophisticated picture of Easter Island

For decades, mystery has swirled around what happened to the founding population of the remote Easter Island, known for its towering stone statues depicting large carved heads. A long-held theory suggests that after the islanders set up camp and carved the giant statues, they destroyed their own society through infighting and a depletion of natural resources.

Mysterious sarcophagus opened in Alexandria

Egyptian archaeologists have unsealed and opened a mysterious granite sarcophagus discovered on a construction site in Alexandria -- only to find the remains of three mummies in a pool of leaked sewage water.