‘Take Cover’ issued Tuesday at Hanford was false alarm, officials say

‘Take Cover’ issued Tuesday at Hanford was false alarm, officials say
Hanford.gov

An alert to “take cover” sent out Tuesday at the Hanford Site was lifted minutes later after it was determined to be a false alarm.

Geoff Tyree of the Hanford Site Office of Communications said a faulty electrical connection triggered what he described as an auto-response for a precautionary “take cover” notice to workers:

A 30-minute precautionary take cover has been lifted in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site after a utility crew determined a faulty electrical connection set off a chlorine alarm at one of the site’s water treatment facilities. There was no leak of chlorine, which is used in the facility’s water treatment process. The chlorine alarm tripped earlier this afternoon and triggered an automatic response that included a precautionary take cover and response by the Hanford Fire Department.

The 200 West Area is located near the center of the site​​​​​​, which spans nearly 600 square miles.

A Take Cover signal at Hanford is a wavering siren. Personnel are to move inside or, if in a vehicle in the field, drive with ventilation off to the nearest suitable facility and segregate from others inside.

Workers are trained to remain in a take cover until they’re released from the protective action.

Chlorine is not the chief chemical concern at the nuclear reservation. Hanford produced plutonium for America’s defense program, creating a massive amount of radioactive waste. Buildings involved in the site’s original mission have been and are being decontaminated and demolished. Thousands of employees are involved in the structural and environmental cleanup.

A 30-minute precautionary take cover has been lifted in the 200 West Area of the Hanford Site after a utility crew determined a faulty electrical connection set off a chlorine alarm at one of the site’s water treatment facilities. There was no leak of chlorine, which is used in

— Hanford Site (@HanfordSite) October 15, 2019