Vote for Alaska’s burliest bears in Fat Bear Week 2021!

Fat Bear Week
Image credit: Explore.com — Fat Bear Week 2021

KING SALMON, Alaska. — Now’s your chance to vote for the burliest bear at Katmai National Park in an annual showdown celebrating the biggest of big ol’ bears preparing for Winter.

The bears of Brooks River prepare for the cold every year by stockpiling and eating as much as they can. How much will they eat, you ask? Let’s just say these bears’ pants won’t fit them anymore by the time that Christmas rolls around.

The single-elimination Fat Bear Week tournament has already begun! It spans from September 29 to October 5, 2021, with voting running from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. PST each day.

On the Fat Bear Week webpage, you can select which bear you’d like to vote for by clicking on their photo until it becomes outlined in blue. Then, all you need to do is enter your email address to verify your submission and click enter!

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You can even download your own Fat Bear Week 2021 bracket by clicking here (please keep in mind that this is an unaltered bracket—some voting has already occurred!

Have you ever wondered why bears must eat up in preparation for the winter? Here’s a tidbit from event organizers explaining the natural process:

Each winter, curled snug in their dens, brown bears endure a months-long famine. During hibernation, bears will not eat or drink and can lose one-third of their body weight. Their winter survival depends on accumulating ample fat reserves before entering the den. Katmai’s brown bears are at their fattest in late summer and early fall after a summer spent trying to satisfy their profound hunger.

Think of this activity like filling out a ‘March Madness’ bracket, except instead of voting for college basketball’s most talented teams, you’re voting on the most gluttonous grizzlies in Alaska! Cast your vote today to be part of fat bear history.

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