WSU Tri-Cities students take break from classes to make toys for autistic children

WSU Tri-Cities students take break from classes to make toys for autistic children

WSU Tri-Cities students are taking a break from their classes to make these colorful sensory toys for dozens of children living with autism.

Wsu student Nicole Steffenhagen who is taking part in the toy making process says her brother was diagnosed with autism at age 2.

She says the Autism Society of Washington, which is where all these toys will be donated to, helped her brother feel less alone.

“They helped show how my brother could be just like normal kids,” says Steffenhagen.

In turn, being able to take part in this service activity is helping students feel more a part of their community.

“I didn’t help out a lot in high school, but as a freshman I’m glad I could be part of something bigger that will be donated toward a good cause,” says WSU student Turner Otto.

None of these students have had any prior experience to building sensory toys before.

But they were able to create several dozens of them with a little imagination.

According to the Autism of Society of Washington, children do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes.

All the sensory toys made at wsu tri-cities today will be given to dozens of autistic children at the holiday celebration hosted by the autism society of washington next month.

WSU Tri-Cities students are taking a break from their classes to make these colorful sensory toys for dozens of children living with autism.

WSU student Nicole Steffenhagen who is taking part in the toy making process says her brother was diagnosed with autism at age 2.

She says the Autism Society of Washington, which is where all these toys will be donated to, helped her brother feel less alone.

“They helped show how my brother could be just like normal kids,” says Steffenhagen.

In turn, being able to take part in this service activity is helping students feel more a part of their community.

“I didn’t help out a lot in high school, but as a freshman I’m glad I could be part of something bigger that will be donated toward a good cause,” says WSU student Turner Otto.

None of these students have had any prior experience to building sensory toys before.

But they were able to create several dozens of them with a little imagination.

According to the Autism of Society of Washington, children do not “outgrow” autism, but studies show that early diagnosis and intervention lead to significantly improved outcomes.

All the sensory toys made at WSU Tri-Cities today will be given to dozens of autistic children at the holiday celebration hosted by the Autism Society of Washington next month.